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Pupils learn to look out for cancer signs

By The Cornishman  |  Posted: January 24, 2013

  • LR Michelle Bradwell (BCAT), Simon Hewett-Avison (Teenage Cancer Trust), Jonathan (Brad) Bradwell (BCAT), Laura Marshall (Student), Joe Goldsmith (Student), Dr Caroline Court (Cornwall & IOS NHS) and Hannah Bradwell (BCAT). PZPM20130116A-001_C.JPG

  • From left, Michelle Bradwell (BCAT), Simon Hewett-Avison (Teenage Cancer Trust), Brad Bradwell (BCAT), students Laura Marshall and Joe Goldsmith, Dr Caroline Court from the NHS and Hannah Bradwell (BCAT).

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YOUNG people have been learning how to spot the early signs of cancer at an event in west Cornwall.

Mounts Bay Academy hosted the first in a series of presentations by the Teenage Cancer Trust to tell pupils about the signs and symptoms of the disease as well as the types of treatment available.

The event was organised by the Bone Cancer Awareness Trust, which was set up by the family of Luke Bradwell, from Penzance, who died from bone cancer last January aged 15.

Luke was a pupil at Mounts Bay Academy.

Simon Hewett-Avison, regional education and advocacy manager for the Teenage Cancer Trust, said: "Six young people are diagnosed with cancer every day, so cancer isn't something that should be ignored in schools, colleges or universities.

"By educating young people and their teachers about cancer, we can remove the stigma often associated with the illness."

The event was also attended by Dr Caroline Court, an NHS consultant in public health who is an adviser to the trust.

Since its launch the organisation has distributed 12,000 awareness leaflets on primary bone cancer to GP surgeries and minor injury units across the county.

Michelle Bradwell, Luke's mother and a trustee along with his father Brad and sister Hannah, said: "We're very proud to be involved in the education programme, a first for Cornwall.

"We would also like to express our thanks to Simon, Caroline and Mounts Bay head teacher Sara Davey for their continued support."

The event was also a chance for the cancer charity to receive a cheque to help it continue raising awareness of bone cancer and promoting early diagnosis.

The academy handed over a cheque for £2,611.43, raised over the past 11 months.

More cash will keep coming in, starting with a now annual Luke Bradwell Memorial Shield rugby match between Mounts Bay and Humphry Davy School.

The game is due to be held tomorrow at the Mennaye Field from 4pm.

Entry is free, and donations will be accepted on the gate.

"Please come along and show your support," said Michelle.

To arrange a free cancer awareness session delivered by the Teenage Cancer Trust's education team please e-mail education@teenagecancertrust.org or call 020-7612 0398.

For more information about the trust see www.bonecancerawarenesstrust.org

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